Beulah Road Bike Route

Consultation has concluded

The Beulah Road Bike Route Working Group has met and taken part in a series of workshops to develop options that will achieve a pedestrian and cyclist friendly Beulah Road. The group have developed suggested traffic calming measures and changes to the road environment and now seek your opinion on the proposals.

The opportunity

The Motor Accident Commission (MAC) through the Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure (DPTI) have offered funding to Councils to undertake safety enhancements on the cycle route that spans from Rundle Street in Adelaide City to Cuthero Terrace, Kensington Gardens.

Council’s Bicycle Strategy was adopted in October 2012. The Strategy identified existing Council and regional routes, including a route on Beulah Road between Glynburn Road and Portrush Road.

This route has long been a popular cycling route link to Norwood using Portrush Road median crossing.

More information about the project can be found below.

What has happened?

Council contacted all residents of Beulah Road in August 2014 and sought participants for a Beulah Road Bike Route Working Party. The group was supported by a technical team, comprising engineers from Council and DPTI, and have developed a number of design concepts for Beulah Road.

These concepts ensure that Beulah Road would:

- be a safer and more pleasant cycling route.

- not divert traffic to other streets.

- be acceptable to the residents.

What happens now?

The design concepts developed for Beulah Road, East and West of Gurrs Road, are presented below.

Council is contacting you to ask what options are suitable to you.

As a resident of Beulah Road, or a regular user of Beulah Road, you will be affected by changes to the road environment.

The responses received will assist Council to determine the solution that will meet the needs of pedestrians, cyclists, motorists and the residents of Beulah Road.

Have your say

After working closely with a team of Beulah Road residents and engineers from DPTI, Council seeks your opinion on the proposed solutions.

Please review the proposed solutions that are presented below and complete the survey by 5 pm on 15 December 2014.

For more information

Contact Kevan Delaney, Council’s Manager Engineering Services, by phone on 8366 4257 or email kdelaney@burnside.sa.gov.au.

What happens next?

The outcomes from the survey will be presented to our Elected Member Council at their January meeting for their endorsement.

Final designs will then be prepared based on Councils endorsed option.

It is expected that construction will be completed by 30 June 2015.

Update

The Beulah Road Bike Route Working Group engagement concluded on 10 September 2014.

A Working Group was established as Council wanted the community involved in the development of design concepts for a cyclist friendly Beulah Road. This route has long been a popular cycling route link to Norwood using Portrush Road median crossing.

The Working Group was supported by a technical team, comprising of engineers from Council and DPTI, and developed a number of design concepts for Beulah Road.

Two engagements followed the Working Group engagement. These were the Beulah Road Bike Route from 1 to 15 December 2014 and the Beulah Road Bike Route (West of Gurrs Road) from 26 February to 13 March 2015.

The Beulah Road Bike Route engagement was open from 1 to 15 December 2015. The Working Group had developed suggested traffic calming measures and changes to the road environment. The design concepts were developed for Beulah Road, East and West of Gurrs Road and were presented to the community during this period. Council sought community feedback on the proposed solutions.

Council considered the initial engagement results and endorsed works comprising of a driveway link, central medians and line marking on the East section of Beulah Road. Council endorsed improvements to the roundabouts on the West section and to consult with these residents on potential flat top road humps.

Council then sought community feedback on the suggestion of a 40 km/h speed limit or the installation of flat top road humps during the Beulah Road Bike Route (West of Gurrs Road) engagement. This was the second engagement and was open from 26 February to 13 March 2015 for people to have their say.

Council has yet to consider the results of the second engagement process however the works on the approved projects is due to start at the end of May 2015 and be completed by 30 June 2015.

The Beulah Road Bike Route Working Group has met and taken part in a series of workshops to develop options that will achieve a pedestrian and cyclist friendly Beulah Road. The group have developed suggested traffic calming measures and changes to the road environment and now seek your opinion on the proposals.

The opportunity

The Motor Accident Commission (MAC) through the Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure (DPTI) have offered funding to Councils to undertake safety enhancements on the cycle route that spans from Rundle Street in Adelaide City to Cuthero Terrace, Kensington Gardens.

Council’s Bicycle Strategy was adopted in October 2012. The Strategy identified existing Council and regional routes, including a route on Beulah Road between Glynburn Road and Portrush Road.

This route has long been a popular cycling route link to Norwood using Portrush Road median crossing.

More information about the project can be found below.

What has happened?

Council contacted all residents of Beulah Road in August 2014 and sought participants for a Beulah Road Bike Route Working Party. The group was supported by a technical team, comprising engineers from Council and DPTI, and have developed a number of design concepts for Beulah Road.

These concepts ensure that Beulah Road would:

- be a safer and more pleasant cycling route.

- not divert traffic to other streets.

- be acceptable to the residents.

What happens now?

The design concepts developed for Beulah Road, East and West of Gurrs Road, are presented below.

Council is contacting you to ask what options are suitable to you.

As a resident of Beulah Road, or a regular user of Beulah Road, you will be affected by changes to the road environment.

The responses received will assist Council to determine the solution that will meet the needs of pedestrians, cyclists, motorists and the residents of Beulah Road.

Have your say

After working closely with a team of Beulah Road residents and engineers from DPTI, Council seeks your opinion on the proposed solutions.

Please review the proposed solutions that are presented below and complete the survey by 5 pm on 15 December 2014.

For more information

Contact Kevan Delaney, Council’s Manager Engineering Services, by phone on 8366 4257 or email kdelaney@burnside.sa.gov.au.

What happens next?

The outcomes from the survey will be presented to our Elected Member Council at their January meeting for their endorsement.

Final designs will then be prepared based on Councils endorsed option.

It is expected that construction will be completed by 30 June 2015.

Update

The Beulah Road Bike Route Working Group engagement concluded on 10 September 2014.

A Working Group was established as Council wanted the community involved in the development of design concepts for a cyclist friendly Beulah Road. This route has long been a popular cycling route link to Norwood using Portrush Road median crossing.

The Working Group was supported by a technical team, comprising of engineers from Council and DPTI, and developed a number of design concepts for Beulah Road.

Two engagements followed the Working Group engagement. These were the Beulah Road Bike Route from 1 to 15 December 2014 and the Beulah Road Bike Route (West of Gurrs Road) from 26 February to 13 March 2015.

The Beulah Road Bike Route engagement was open from 1 to 15 December 2015. The Working Group had developed suggested traffic calming measures and changes to the road environment. The design concepts were developed for Beulah Road, East and West of Gurrs Road and were presented to the community during this period. Council sought community feedback on the proposed solutions.

Council considered the initial engagement results and endorsed works comprising of a driveway link, central medians and line marking on the East section of Beulah Road. Council endorsed improvements to the roundabouts on the West section and to consult with these residents on potential flat top road humps.

Council then sought community feedback on the suggestion of a 40 km/h speed limit or the installation of flat top road humps during the Beulah Road Bike Route (West of Gurrs Road) engagement. This was the second engagement and was open from 26 February to 13 March 2015 for people to have their say.

Council has yet to consider the results of the second engagement process however the works on the approved projects is due to start at the end of May 2015 and be completed by 30 June 2015.

Consultation has concluded
  • Further information below.

    almost 3 years ago

    Please scroll down to view the design concepts for Beulah Road, East and West of Gurrs Road.

    Please scroll down to view the design concepts for Beulah Road, East and West of Gurrs Road.

  • East section - Glynburn Rd to Gurrs Rd

    almost 3 years ago
    East section map

    In this section of Beulah Road:

    - the road is curvilinear and 8.5m wide.

    - there are central medians and the road lanes are 3.7m on either side of these medians.

    - the speed limit is 50km/h.

    View full-sized image

    Item 1 - Off Street Bicycle Path within Bradman Reserve

    The Working Party proposed an off-street bicycle path on this busy section of Beulah Road for cyclist and motorist safety.

    This final concept could be either a shared cyclist and pedestrian path constructed in Bradman Reserve, or, a separate cyclist path and footpath.

    Item 2 - Realign the painted island on Beulah Road at Yeronga Avenue

    Narrow the painted island on Beulah Road at the intersection with Yeronga Avenue to create more road width and thus more space for cyclists and motorists to safely use the road.  

    Item 3 - Entry Median at Glynburn Road

    The Working Party proposed that an ‘Entry Statement’ on Beulah Road at the intersection with Glynburn Road be installed to create the sense of a local road, discourage cut-through traffic, and reduce traffic speed by:

    - building a central median

    - planting additional trees on the verge

    - building out section of the kerb at this location to physically narrow the road.

    It was noted that the installation of a central median would reduce the road width and slow down vehicles turning in and out of Beulah Road.

    Item 4 - Landscaped Driveway Entry or Driveway Link

    Option 1 - Driveway Entry

    Option 2 - Driveway Link

    To lower motorist speeds on Beulah Road the Working Party propose two options (a driveway entry or a driveway link) to be constructed on Beulah Road where it intersects with Orange Grove.

    Both options are located in existing no-stopping zones so no parking is lost. Also a cycling lane will be installed on each side of the road.

    These options would slow traffic and create a sense of a local road.

    Option 1 - Driveway Entry

    A driveway entry changes the priority direction of the traffic. In this proposal a new Give Way sign will be installed on Beulah Road at the intersection with Orange Grove. Traffic heading westbound on Beulah Road will be required to Give Way to traffic on Orange Grove.

    Traffic travelling eastbound on Beulah Road will be required to indicate to turn left at the intersection to continue along to Glynburn Road.

    Option 2 - Driveway Link

    A driveway link narrows the road into one shared lane, slowing traffic down. The link allows for one vehicle at a time with motorists required to give way to vehicles using the link before entering.

     

    In this section of Beulah Road:

    - the road is curvilinear and 8.5m wide.

    - there are central medians and the road lanes are 3.7m on either side of these medians.

    - the speed limit is 50km/h.

    View full-sized image

    Item 1 - Off Street Bicycle Path within Bradman Reserve

    The Working Party proposed an off-street bicycle path on this busy section of Beulah Road for cyclist and motorist safety.

    This final concept could be either a shared cyclist and pedestrian path constructed in Bradman Reserve, or, a separate cyclist path and footpath.

    Item 2 - Realign the painted island on Beulah Road at Yeronga Avenue

    Narrow the painted island on Beulah Road at the intersection with Yeronga Avenue to create more road width and thus more space for cyclists and motorists to safely use the road.  

    Item 3 - Entry Median at Glynburn Road

    The Working Party proposed that an ‘Entry Statement’ on Beulah Road at the intersection with Glynburn Road be installed to create the sense of a local road, discourage cut-through traffic, and reduce traffic speed by:

    - building a central median

    - planting additional trees on the verge

    - building out section of the kerb at this location to physically narrow the road.

    It was noted that the installation of a central median would reduce the road width and slow down vehicles turning in and out of Beulah Road.

    Item 4 - Landscaped Driveway Entry or Driveway Link

    Option 1 - Driveway Entry

    Option 2 - Driveway Link

    To lower motorist speeds on Beulah Road the Working Party propose two options (a driveway entry or a driveway link) to be constructed on Beulah Road where it intersects with Orange Grove.

    Both options are located in existing no-stopping zones so no parking is lost. Also a cycling lane will be installed on each side of the road.

    These options would slow traffic and create a sense of a local road.

    Option 1 - Driveway Entry

    A driveway entry changes the priority direction of the traffic. In this proposal a new Give Way sign will be installed on Beulah Road at the intersection with Orange Grove. Traffic heading westbound on Beulah Road will be required to Give Way to traffic on Orange Grove.

    Traffic travelling eastbound on Beulah Road will be required to indicate to turn left at the intersection to continue along to Glynburn Road.

    Option 2 - Driveway Link

    A driveway link narrows the road into one shared lane, slowing traffic down. The link allows for one vehicle at a time with motorists required to give way to vehicles using the link before entering.

     

  • West section - Gurrs Rd to Portrush Rd

    almost 3 years ago
    West section map

    In this section of Beulah Road:

    - the road is 9.5m wide between Gurrs Road and Salop Street and 11.7m wide between Salop Street and Portrush Road.

    - there are three roundabouts at Gurrs Road, Salop Street and Howard Street.

    - the speed limit is 50km/h.

    - residents sought to remind motorists that it is a local residential road, to reduce motorist speed and to create an environment where the cyclist are more visible.

    View full-sized image

    Item 1 - Changes to roundabouts

    Bicycle related crashes are over-represented at roundabouts.  This is because motorists enter the roundabout at approximately 35km/h and this speed reduces the likelihood that they will see a bicycle that has already entered the roundabout.

    To reduce the speed of motorists as they enter each of the three roundabouts on this section of Beulah Road, the Working Party proposes changes to the kerb and median islands. 

    This proposal would see on every roundabout:

    - the kerbs pushed further out into the street.

    - the splitter islands on each of the approaches changed so traffic enters the roundabout more directly instead of at the current angle. 

    -
    the roundabout apron (the ring around the centre island) may be made larger and stronger for large trucks that are not able to negotiate the tighter turns.

    The intent is to reduce the speed of motorists by tightening up the turns required to navigate the roundabout.

    Item 2 Angled Slow Points (ASP)

    The Working Party proposed that two ASPs would be installed on Beulah Road between Howard Street and Portrush Road. The ASPs allow for two-way traffic. The ASPs will make Beulah Road a less appealing option for motorists who cut through between Glynburn Road and Portrush Road; and will reduce motorist speed in that area.

    ASPs must be installed within 50m of an intersection, spaced between 80m and 120m apart, and placed where they do not interfere with driveways.

    This proposal will result in the loss of some parking spaces for residents.

    Option 1

    In Option 1, the eastern ASP is located closer to the intersection, where parking is already restricted, in front of 213/215, and, 218/224 Beulah Road. Parking would be removed between the driveways in these locations.

    The western ASP is located in front of 201/203, and, 202/204 Beulah Road. Parking will be removed between the driveways in these locations. An estimated 14 spaces would be lost as a result of the two ASPs in this option.

    View full-sized image

    Option 2

    In option 2 the western ASP is in the same location as option 1 - in front of 201/203, and, 202/204 Beulah Road. Parking will be removed between the driveways in these locations.

    The eastern ASP is located further east along Beulah Road in front of 222/224/226, and, 215/217 Beulah Road. Parking would be removed between the driveways in these locations. An estimated 15 spaces would be lost as a result of the two ASPs in Option 2.

     View full-sized image

    In this section of Beulah Road:

    - the road is 9.5m wide between Gurrs Road and Salop Street and 11.7m wide between Salop Street and Portrush Road.

    - there are three roundabouts at Gurrs Road, Salop Street and Howard Street.

    - the speed limit is 50km/h.

    - residents sought to remind motorists that it is a local residential road, to reduce motorist speed and to create an environment where the cyclist are more visible.

    View full-sized image

    Item 1 - Changes to roundabouts

    Bicycle related crashes are over-represented at roundabouts.  This is because motorists enter the roundabout at approximately 35km/h and this speed reduces the likelihood that they will see a bicycle that has already entered the roundabout.

    To reduce the speed of motorists as they enter each of the three roundabouts on this section of Beulah Road, the Working Party proposes changes to the kerb and median islands. 

    This proposal would see on every roundabout:

    - the kerbs pushed further out into the street.

    - the splitter islands on each of the approaches changed so traffic enters the roundabout more directly instead of at the current angle. 

    -
    the roundabout apron (the ring around the centre island) may be made larger and stronger for large trucks that are not able to negotiate the tighter turns.

    The intent is to reduce the speed of motorists by tightening up the turns required to navigate the roundabout.

    Item 2 Angled Slow Points (ASP)

    The Working Party proposed that two ASPs would be installed on Beulah Road between Howard Street and Portrush Road. The ASPs allow for two-way traffic. The ASPs will make Beulah Road a less appealing option for motorists who cut through between Glynburn Road and Portrush Road; and will reduce motorist speed in that area.

    ASPs must be installed within 50m of an intersection, spaced between 80m and 120m apart, and placed where they do not interfere with driveways.

    This proposal will result in the loss of some parking spaces for residents.

    Option 1

    In Option 1, the eastern ASP is located closer to the intersection, where parking is already restricted, in front of 213/215, and, 218/224 Beulah Road. Parking would be removed between the driveways in these locations.

    The western ASP is located in front of 201/203, and, 202/204 Beulah Road. Parking will be removed between the driveways in these locations. An estimated 14 spaces would be lost as a result of the two ASPs in this option.

    View full-sized image

    Option 2

    In option 2 the western ASP is in the same location as option 1 - in front of 201/203, and, 202/204 Beulah Road. Parking will be removed between the driveways in these locations.

    The eastern ASP is located further east along Beulah Road in front of 222/224/226, and, 215/217 Beulah Road. Parking would be removed between the driveways in these locations. An estimated 15 spaces would be lost as a result of the two ASPs in Option 2.

     View full-sized image