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WELCOME.

This is our media hub of all things Burnside.

A hub for local news about people, businesses and happenings in our community.

You will see some beautiful photos of Wyfield Reserve, one of Burnside's biodiversity sites, at the top right of this page.



WELCOME.

This is our media hub of all things Burnside.

A hub for local news about people, businesses and happenings in our community.

You will see some beautiful photos of Wyfield Reserve, one of Burnside's biodiversity sites, at the top right of this page.


  • Burnside Highlights 13 October 2021

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    Mayor Anne Monceaux shares this week's Burnside Highlights from last night's Council meeting.

    Summary:
    ✅ Brock Reserve toilets approved
    ✅ Mayor's Christmas Card competition open until 17 November
    ✅ 88% of Burnside residents over 15 have received their first COVID-19 vaccination shot, 72.3% have received both
    ✅ Market at the Hub open this Saturday from 9 am to 1 pm
    ✅ Community information session at Bell Yett Reserve this Saturday from 9.30 am to 11 am
    ✅ Garage Sale Trail coming to Burnside on 13-14 and 20-21 November
    ✅ Successful working bee at Laurel Avenue Pirkurna Wirra/Peter Bennett Organic Community Garden last Saturday.

    This is just a summary of some of the things happening within the City of Burnside. You can read the full minute's from yesterday's meeting at bit.ly/BurnsideAgendasMinutes

  • Totem Poles Artwork Installed at Kensington Gardens Reserve

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    A Council grant is being used to install and paint totem poles in Kensington Gardens Reserve, near the Preschool, as part of the Kensington Gardens Reserve Project. The grant of $15,000 was provided to Marra Dreaming, as part of Council’s Community Public Art Fund.

    Marra Dreaming is a cultural community centre located in Salisbury. It was established in 1999 by predominately Aboriginal women from various regions of Australia. It was initially set up to provide a space for Aboriginal people to develop their artwork and is now a thriving meeting place for community to experience and explore the Aboriginal culture.

    Preschool Director Catherine Honeychurch says Council has kept staff and the children involved in the redevelopment of the Reserve. “We have had site visits and talks from elders about Indigenous culture. The children keep a journal of construction activities and work they see happening on the project,” Catherine says. “I am really pleased that Council has taken these steps.”

    Marra Dreaming and Kaurna have worked together on designs for the totem poles that complement the area and the work is being undertaken by artist Raylene Snow and her children Thomas and Samantha.

    Raylene says the paintings depict the story of the River Torrens and the animals, birds, berries and fruits that grow and live nearby. Each pole takes approximately two days to complete.

    Marra Dreaming are also working closely with Kensington Gardens Preschool and their students throughout the works, including cultural activities such as traditional basket weaving that they are able to learn about and practice.

    Students Ben, 5, Skye,4 and Nick, 5 with some of the totem poles and in the background a mural by artist Scott Rothman.

    Indigenous artist Tom Snow paints one of the totem poles with his sister Samantha Egan in the background.

  • Volunteer Defence Corps - Windback Wednesday

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    In July 1940 Council agreed to fill in and level an area east of Burnside Town Hall, on the corner of Hyde Street and Greenhill Road, to be used as a Parade Ground by members of the Returned Soldier’s League Volunteer Defence Corps. The Burnside Parade Ground was used for marches, weapons training, trench digging exercises and musketry drills.

    The Volunteer Defence Corps (VDC) was a part-time volunteer military force of World War II. Established in 1940, it initially comprised of ex-servicemen who had served in World War I. From 1941 the Corp was controlled by the government, who gave the organisation the role of training for guerrilla warfare and collecting local intelligence.

    Photographs of the VDC training at the Burnside Parade Ground in 1942/43 courtesy of the State Library of South Australia.

  • Bell Yett Reserve - the past and the future

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    The name Bell Yett was chosen by the 1877 owner of the property, Ellen Barham Black. Ellen migrated to South Australia with her three children from Wigtown, Scotland. In Wigtown there was a field named Bell Yett, which was named after the field’s gate (yett) which had a bell on top of it. The Wattle Park property was named after this, therefore the name literally means Bell Gate.

    Helen Foster Barham Black shared about her childhood at Bell Yett (1981):

    “Bell Yett was a wonderful place for children, with a creek running from one end to the other through the paddocks and garden; there were two ponds where we used to play a good deal. We usually had at least two horses and two cows; calves of course were an annual event. There were fruit trees of great many sorts and plenty of grape vines. We practically lived outside except when it was raining.”

    Excerpt from Elizabeth Warburton, The Paddocks Beneath: A History of Burnside From the Beginning

    In 1948, the property was sold to the Sisters of the Convent of Mercy, it was used for teaching, studying and social work.

    In 1971, the property of Bell Yett was subdivided and the City of Burnside purchased the ‘old cow paddock’ for a public reserve.

    A large Bunya Pine at the western end of the Reserve is believed to be one of the last remnants of the original Bell Yett garden.

    The future of the reserve

    Today Bell Yett Reserve consists of a car park, two netball / tennis courts, a basketball hoop, a storage shed, a playing field, biodiversity zones in the south and west sections, a playground, amenities block, bench seating, drinking fountain and rubble pathways. Stonyfell Creek runs through the Reserve.

    To ensure that the future maintenance and improvement of the Reserve are sensitive, planned, purposeful and complementary, a new master plan for Bell Yett Reserve is being developed and Council wants your input. This is a community-led master plan and we encourage you to join the working group to be involved.

    A master plan will also provide a basis for scheduling works in a financially sustainable way.

    Have you say by completing the online survey below by 5 pm Monday 18 October 2021.

    Community Information Session

    There will be an Information Session in Bell Yett Reserve from 9.30 am - 11 am on Saturday 16 October 2021.

    This will be an opportunity to have your say in person, as well as gather more information on the Bell Yett Reserve Master Plan.

    Click to complete the Survey


  • Toll Gate - Windback Wednesday

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    Built in 1841, the old toll house at the base of the South Eastern Freeway raised funds for the construction of the road from Adelaide to Mount Barker. As the only toll in the colony, the scheme met public hostility, and the funds raised were insufficient. Consequently, in 1847, the toll was removed.

    This image is of the 1842 watercolour painting by Alexander Murray (1803 - 1880) entitled 'The first toll bar in South Australia, entrance to Glen Osmond'. This painting is in the Art Gallery of South Australia collection.

    The toll house is the first stop on the Glen Osmond Historic Walk, which you can download.

  • Christmas Card Competition

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    Mayor's Christmas Card Design Competition

    Mayor Anne Monceaux invites children in Years 3 -4 to help us capture the spirit of Christmas by designing our annual Christmas card for 2021.

    Theme: What makes an Australian Christmas?

    Who: Burnside school children in Years 3-4

    Medium: Draw, paint or do any form of design

    Enter online or through your school.


  • Burnside Highlights 29 September 2021

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    Mayor of Burnside Anne Monceaux shares this week's Burnside Highlights from our 28 September Council meeting.

    Summary:
    ✅ Dulwich Community Centre to be redeveloped in 2022/23
    ✅ Nature Festival Inspired by Trees exhibition at the Burnside Civic Centre
    ✅ Active Ageing Week activities
    ✅ Bell Yett Reserve Master Plan out for consultation
    ✅ Award nomination for The Shed.

    This is just a summary of some of the things happening within the City of Burnside. You can read the full minute's from the meeting at bit.ly/BurnsideAgendasMinutes

  • Walker's Violet Farm - Windback Wednesday

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    Alf Walker’s 14-acre violet farm near Magill was a favourite Sunday excursion during the 1920s. In its heyday, the farm attracted 2,000 people each weekend. Visitors paid six pennies to enter, picking as many violets as they could carry and enjoyed afternoon tea at the farmhouse or had a picnic in the paddock.

    Pictured: Walker's Violet Farm, circa 1924. Burnside Local History Collection.

  • Active Ageing Week 4 – 10 October 2021

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    Move Your Way

    Active ageing includes staying physically active, staying mentally active, and staying socially connected and active within your community. Connecting with others, learning new skills, making an ongoing contribution to society, and doing the things that give us a sense of purpose are all important to ageing well.

    Kana Nathan

    At almost 83 years old, Kana Nathan is more active than most 50 year-olds! He runs a weekly Fit and Fab class at Burnside Council to help seniors improve their health and fitness. “As we mature our body undergoes physical and physiological changes,” he says. “We have to accept that as a reality if we want to actively age.” Losing muscle mass means losing muscle strength. With age we are less flexible and our joints less forgiving. Mobility is challenged, reflexes slow, coordination is poor and our balance is affected. “We can’t stop the ageing process but we can slow it,” Kana says. “We concentrate on resistance training to increase and maintain muscle mass and power and that is also good for bone health.” In Kana’s group the youngest member is mid 70s and the oldest is 94! Kana says there is a focus on balance exercises as better balance means less falls and injuries. “We teach them what to do if they have a fall at home, how to safely roll from their back to their side, to use furniture to help get themselves up, and always call a family member to let them know.” The class always contains some general health and wellbeing tips such as how to walk safely on uneven surfaces by lifting the toes and placing the heel down first. “I also show them how to breathe properly,” Kana says. “Increasing the volume of lung capacity helps the body absorb oxygen and expel carbon dioxide.” In addition there are brain exercises, meditation and mindfulness. “The class is not just about exercise, it is health education as well,” Kana says. “Did you know that 50 per cent of the body’s bones, muscles, nervous system and blood supply is in the lower limbs?”

  • Active Ageing Week 4 - 8 October

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    Annie Reid was terrified of the prospect of retirement as she had no hobbies. “I put a spurt on and joined a Bonsai Club,” she says. After two years with a regular hobby she retired in 2014 at the age of 64. Having been a teacher for more than 40 years she soon missed it and after only a year she returned to short term contracts and relief teaching.

    “I am not good at being bored,” she says. “I had been selling some of my art at Pepper Street and I liked the feel of the place.” So she signed up as a volunteer and spends 3 days each fortnight working in the coffee shop and gift shop. “After a career of teaching adolescents it was nice to have adult conversation,” she jokes.

    She ‘officially’ retired at the end of 2020 at the age of 71 but keeps very active both physically and mentally. “I have done more reading in retirement than in my life,” she says. “I read more than 40 books in a year, fiction and non-fiction.” She also walks a lot to keep fit.

    But it was her love of Japan that brought about her art passion. “We had visited Japan several times and I had seen the Temari, exquisitely embroidered material balls. Temari balls are a folk art form and Japanese craft, originating in China and introduced to Japan around the 7th century A.D. ‘Temari’ means ‘hand ball’ in Japanese. “The balls were used for play by young girls and then the mothers started embroidering them and they became an art form,” Annie says. Annie learnt how to make them and now displays and sells them at Pepper Street.


Page last updated: 15 October 2021, 09:00