FOCUS On Burnside - the news hub

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WELCOME.

This is our media hub of all things Burnside.

A hub for local news about people, businesses and happenings in our community.

You will see some beautiful photos of Wyfield Reserve, one of Burnside's biodiversity sites, at the top right of this page.



WELCOME.

This is our media hub of all things Burnside.

A hub for local news about people, businesses and happenings in our community.

You will see some beautiful photos of Wyfield Reserve, one of Burnside's biodiversity sites, at the top right of this page.


  • Red-brown sea in Waterfall Gully

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    In September 1931, the narrow creeks of the eastern suburbs broke their banks. Waterfall Gully Road turned into a red-brown sea and the threat of a landslide in the hills felt imminent. Water coursed through the streets, sweeping through gardens while residents scrambled to protect their homes. In some instances, houses flooded to the ceiling.

    Despite the estimated thousands of pounds of damage, some of the community enjoyed the event. People watched the spectacle from the banks of the Torrens or paddled their canoes and dinghies onto the newly formed lakes.

    Photographs from the Local History Collection show the floods at Kensington Road, Portrush Road and Hazelwood Park.

  • Glenside Road Naming

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    UPDATE


    At the meeting on 9 February 2021, Council resolved (090221/12745):


    That Council, in accordance with Section 219 of the Local Government Act 1999, resolves to adopt road names within Stage 2 of the Glenside redevelopment, being Blue Gum Drive, Rose Lane, Azalea Lane, Dahlia Lane, Cypress Street, Dianella Street, Lomandra Avenue and Tea Tree Street as well as extensions of Harriet Lucy Drive, Mulberry Road, Eucalyptus Lane and Amber Woods Drive.



    The City of Burnside is seeking community feedback on the following proposed names for eight (8) new internal roads and four (4) extensions of existing roads within stage 2 of the Glenside redevelopment site.

    The proposed names for the eight new roads are:

    • Blue Gum Drive;
    • Rose Lane;
    • Azalea Lane;
    • Dahlia Lane;
    • Lomandra Avenue;
    • Dianella Street;
    • Tea Tree Street; and
    • Cypress Street.

    There are also the extensions of Harriet Lucy Drive, Mulberry Road, Eucalyptus Lane and Amber Woods Drive.

    In line with Council’s Naming of Public Places Policy, feedback is being sought on these names.

    Should you wish to suggest an alternative name, please ensure that you convey why you are suggesting the alternative for consideration.

    For more information contact Council’s Senior Property Officer, James Brennan, on jbrennan@burnside.sa.gov.au or telephone 8366 4200.

    Have your say by Monday 14 December.

    Feedback

  • Annual Community Survey 2020

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    The Annual Community Survey is one of the many tools that Council uses to enhance community input into the planning of council business and future years' annual budgets.

    Councils are required to find the balance between what residents expect Council to deliver and what is fiscally possible and realistic for Council. A statistically relevant consultative process such as an Annual Community Survey can provide relevant and timely data, which may assist with informed decision making.

    It is important for Council to understand more about community opinions and feedback on various aspects of Council services.

    Each year an Annual Community Survey is conducted to gauge community satisfaction with Council services, or opinion on key issues. The survey is conducted in a cycle of trend data every second year, and a strategic survey for each intervening year. You can view past survey's online at burnside.sa.gov.au

    The Survey is now open until 5 pm Friday 4 December 2020. You can also have your say, even if you don't receive a call. Simply complete the online Survey.

    Survey

  • Tusmore Wading Pool Review

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    The Tusmore Park wading pool has been popular with families, particularly those with toddlers, for many years.

    However the infrastructure is ageing and is now due for replacement.

    In early 2020 Council sought feedback from the community on the future of this space. The community gave strong support for retaining a water play feature, and gave some great suggestions on additional features that could be included.

    Based on this feedback, four (4) concept designs have been developed, and Council is now seeking community input to help decide what happens next.

    Time to Vote

  • How do you want to be represented?

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    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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    For over 60 years, the Council has had an elected Mayor and 12 Councillors representing 6 wards (local areas).

    Every eight years, the Council must consider its composition and structure to ensure that it is representing all electors in the community fairly. As part of the review we must consider and ask residents for their opinions on a number of issues.

    This is the first consultation in the Representation Review Process. Following this consultation, the Council will review the feedback received and determine its preferred model of representation. A further consultation will then be conducted on Council’s preferred model. It is important to have your say now so that your feedback is considered by Council when determining the preferred model.

    Any changes to representation and wards will be in place for the November 2022 Local Government Elections.

    Council is seeking your feedback on how you want to be represented.

    What are the options?**

    Council is reviewing its composition and structure as part of its Representation Review. This includes reviewing whether the council area should be divided into wards and if so, how many wards should Council have? It also includes reviewing the number of councillors in each ward and in total.

    Five different options are proposed for your consideration and you can always propose other options on how the council can best represent its community.


    Survey

  • New CAP Chair

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    The role of the Council Assessment Panel (CAP) is to assist Council with the assessment and determination of development applications. The CAP was established under the Planning, Development and Infrastructure Act 2016 (PDI Act).] Carol Muzyk has taken over the role of CAP Chair from Bill Chandler.

    By profession Carol Muzyk (Music) is an environmental scientist and a land use planner. Having both a science background and a town planning background. She has the ability to critically assess, review and provide specialist advice on both planning issues and environmental issues.

    She has extensive skills and experience in environment impact assessment, climate change adaptation, strategic planning and policy development, land use planning and public health having been employed by various State and Local Government (SA, NSW, NT and QLD) agencies spanning a twenty five (25) year employment history.

    As a direct result of her qualifications, skills and experience in both town planning and environmental management she has been appointed to various Boards and Committees to provide expert advice, recommendations, and decisions determination. Through these appointments she has provided professional and technical advice to the Minister for Planning, the EPA SA Board, Local Government councils, Council Development Assessment Panels and various State and Federal Government agencies. Carol has also been engaged as a sessional lecturer and tutor at the University of South Australia.

    On her return from the eastern states in March 2020, Carol established her environmental and land use planning consultancy practice. Her work currently focusses on identification and management of the environmental impacts of legacy landfills.

    In her spare time Carol is a Civil Celebrant. Over the past 15 years she has utilised her creative writing skills to solemnise over 500 Marriages, conduct over 300 Life Direction Ceremonies, officiate Funerals and Memorial Services, and deliver presentations at workshops and corporate functions.

    Carol has two adult sons. After spending 5 years in the Australian Defence Force her eldest son completed a degree in Paramedical Science and is now a qualified Paramedic working in the northern metropolitan area. Her youngest son completed a degree in Business Management in mid-2020 and is currently undergoing Officer training with the Australian Army Reserves.

  • 100 years of Remembrance Day

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    “Ten thousand miles from here their bones are laid; But yet their spirits live with us and shine. This stone records their sacrifice divine And proves to all their glory shall not fade. No! Shall not fade. Each year as time goes on some tender hand shall deck this stone with flowers, in memory of these noble men of ours – in memory of their duty nobly done.”

    Ode to the Soldiers’ Memorial at Magill, November 1920.

    On 14 November 1920, Brigadier General Leane unveiled the Magill Soldiers’ Memorial. The Last Post played as the Brigadier uncovered the white marble, revealing the names of 33 local soldiers who made the supreme sacrifice.

    The monument originally stood on the grounds of Magill School (now Pepper Street Arts Centre). In 1956, it was relocated to its present site on the corner of Magill and Penfold Roads.

    Today we remember all those who fought and died to keep us free.

  • Second Planning Reform consultation

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    The proposed new planning system could change our City’s landscape and impact the residential character of your street or suburb, potentially affecting your general sense of community as well as the bottom line of property values.

    The State Government conducted a public consultation on a draft Planning and Design Code from October 2019 to February 2020.

    The City of Burnside made a submission as part of this consultation and encouraged our community to make submissions as well.

    Over 2000 submissions were received by the State Government and, in response, have now released a revised draft Planning and Design Code.

    Find out more at the project page.

  • Wine icon 176 years in Magill

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    With French grapevine cuttings in hand Dr Christopher and Mary Penfold journeyed to Australia from England in 1844. The Penfolds purchased land in Makgill (now Magill) and built a small stone cottage known as the Grange. Christopher planted the fruit, initially using the wine to treat his patients. While her husband was on rounds, Mary tended the vineyards.

    The business grew in popularity and after Christopher’s death in 1870, Mary assumed total responsibility of the vineyards. Mary passed away in 1896, but her grandsons were determined to continue the company. Penfolds went on to become a leading Australian winery.

    The grange vineyard in Magill is smaller today, but the cottage, buildings and some of the vines remain as a reminder of its early history.

    Aerial view of Penfolds in 1928

  • Happy 25th Birthday Pepper Street!

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    The Pepper Street Arts Centre is celebrating 25 years this week! The Arts Centre is a valuable community space that promotes local artists and hosts workshops for budding creators to develop new skills.

    The Arts Centre building is a little bit older than 25, in fact, it is 138 years old!

    Built in 1882, the site was originally the Magill village primary school and accommodated 150 pupils. By 1924, the school was overcrowded and some classes were moved to the Brougham Street community hall. Two years later, a new classroom was constructed on the corner of Penfold Road and Adelaide Street.

    Junior students continued to attend classes in the ‘old’ school building until 1963. The site was then used by the Art Faculty of Wattle Park Teachers’ College and later by the Kent Town Special School. In 1988, Burnside Council purchased the building and launched the Arts Centre in 1995.

    Photograph: Magill Primary School 1882

Page last updated: 23 Sep 2022, 09:31 PM