40 km/h Precinct Trial

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Consultation has concluded

Council proposes a 12 month trial of a 40 km/h speed limit precinct excluding main roads

Why 40 km/h?

Speed limits are in place throughout South Australia and enforced for the safety of all road users.

Speed limits can vary from area to area and can relate to land use, such as the proximity to schools, the level of pedestrian and cyclist activity or if it is a local residential road.

Lower speed limits have the potential to save lives, prevent and reduce the number of accidents, and decrease through traffic. They improve the safety of pedestrians and cyclists without

Council proposes a 12 month trial of a 40 km/h speed limit precinct excluding main roads

Why 40 km/h?

Speed limits are in place throughout South Australia and enforced for the safety of all road users.

Speed limits can vary from area to area and can relate to land use, such as the proximity to schools, the level of pedestrian and cyclist activity or if it is a local residential road.

Lower speed limits have the potential to save lives, prevent and reduce the number of accidents, and decrease through traffic. They improve the safety of pedestrians and cyclists without significantly affecting vehicle travel times or conditions.

Our community has an opportunity to trial, for 12 months, a 40 km/h speed limit in a precinct located in Beulah Park and part of Kensington Park, not including the main roads. At the end of the 12 month trial, Council will survey the residents of this precinct to determine if 40 km/h local roads could be part of the City of Burnside's future.

If this trial is supported by the community, Council will apply to the Minister for Road Safety to implement a trial 40 km/h zone.

Where is the precinct?

The trial precinct includes all local roads in the area bordered by Magill Road, Glynburn Road, The Parade and Portrush Road.

The four main roads will not be part of this trial with no changes to the speed limits on these roads.

When will the changes happen?

To introduce a lower speed limit Council requires approval from the Minister for Road Safety.

The results of this survey will be reviewed and presented to Council as part of Council's decision-making process.

If Council proceeds with the trial an application will be made to the Minister for Road Safety to implement the trial 40 km/h precinct, and as part of this process, the results of this community engagement would also be provided.

This is a lengthy process and would see changes to the speed limit, if supported and approved, taking place in mid-2016.

The benefits for our community

A 40 km/h speed limit has the potential to:

  • save lives
  • prevent or reduce the number and severity of accidents
  • create a safer environment for cyclists
  • improve safety for pedestrians
  • maintain the existing road environment (no need for road humps, driveway links or other traffic calming devices)
  • improve the amenity of your neighbourhood with reduced vehicle noise
  • decrease through traffic.

All of these benefits without noticeably impacting motorist travel times.

Feedback requested

Please complete the survey below by 5 pm Friday 27 November.

Your responses to this survey will guide Council on how to proceed.

For more information

Do you want more information? Contact David Hayes, Council's Principal Traffic Engineer, on 8366 4200.

Consultation has concluded
  • Update

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    08 Apr 2016

    The City of Burnside community had an opportunity to trial, for 12 months, a 40 km/h speed limit in a precinct that included Beulah Park and part of Kensington Park.

    The proposed precinct for the trial included all local streets within in the area bordered by Magill Road, Glynburn Road, The Parade and Portrush Road.

    If the community supported the trial, Council would be required to apply to the Minister for Road Safety to implement the 40 km/h precinct. It was planned that residents would be surveyed in 12 months following the introduction to see if they supported maintaining the lowered speed limit.

    The engagement period commenced on 22 October and closed 27 November 2015. Over 400 responses were received for this engagement.

    Respondent’s opinions varied widely in regard to their responses. Respondents tended to either strongly support the reduced speed limit or strongly oppose it.

    Respondents supporting the 40 km/h speed limit believed that the speed reduction would improve the safety and amenity of the local streets for residents, motorists, cyclists and pedestrians.

    Of those that did not support the trial, the most common response was that the reduction in speed was unnecessary and that speeding and number of crashes in the local streets is not an issue.

    The City of Burnside did not receive the required response rate to this engagement; therefore the trial will not be pursued at this time.