FOCUS On Burnside - the news hub

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WELCOME.

This is our media hub of all things Burnside.

A hub for local news about people, businesses and happenings in our community.

You will see some beautiful photos of Wyfield Reserve, one of Burnside's biodiversity sites, at the top right of this page.



WELCOME.

This is our media hub of all things Burnside.

A hub for local news about people, businesses and happenings in our community.

You will see some beautiful photos of Wyfield Reserve, one of Burnside's biodiversity sites, at the top right of this page.


  • Dr Ellis awarded Pelzer Prize for environmental contributions

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    Last night Conservation SA hosted their 2024 SA Environment Awards – devoted to spotlighting the state's most dedicated environment champions.

    In what is an incredible achievement, City of Burnside Coordinator Conservation and Land Management Dr Mark Ellis won the Pelzer Prize in a highly competitive and decorated field. Green Adelaide's prestigious Pelzer Prize is awarded to those who have gone above and beyond to restore landscapes, create habitat for wildlife, connect people to nature, or clean up our parks, beaches and waterways.

    Since 2013, Dr Ellis has led the City of Burnside’s Conservation and Land Management Program. Through this program, he leads the management of 130 hectares of reserves and is actively involved in the management of the Council’s urban biodiversity sites. Dr Ellis also develops detailed management plans and guides restoration works by skilled contractors, staff and volunteers.

    You might know Dr Ellis through his work at the City of Burnside Biodiversity Nursery and the Native Plant Giveaway program (now open for orders), one of the city’s most in-demand annual initiatives. Dr Ellis is also responsible for the restoration of Michael Perry Botanic Reserve, converting the previously weed-infested historical site into a beautiful hub of over 350 native floras.


    Burnside at Work: Dr Mark Ellis and the Biodiversity Nursery


    Dr Ellis has made a substantial contribution to the restoration of landscapes in urban Adelaide. As a champion for indigenous landscapes and botanical beauty, Dr Ellis has contributed to the restoration of hundreds of hectares and created beautiful places for people to enjoy.

    Congratulations to Dr Mark Ellis the 2024 Pelzer Prize winner!

    Dr Ellis will be speaking at the 2024 Burnside Environment and Sustainability Expo on 15 June at the Burnside Civic Centre. Talking all about the Native Plant Giveaway and Biodiversity in Burnside, Dr Ellis will be speaking on the main stage from 1.20 pm.

    For more information on the Environment and Sustainability Expo, visit our website.


    Left to right: Green Adelaide Pelzer Prize winners James Smith (2023), Dr Mark Ellis (2024) and Jill Woodlands (2021).


    Green Adelaide's Pelzer Prize.
    Awarded to Dr Mark Ellis


















    Dr Ellis leads a community tour through Michael Perry Botanic Reserve




  • Council Fund Assisting Residents with Tree Works

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    Did you know the City of Burnside has a fund dedicated to helping residents care for regulated and significant trees on private property?

    It is the Regulated and Significant Tree Assistance fund, also known as RASTA.

    Following a successful application to Council, a reimbursement of up to 75 per cent of the work, capped at $2,000 per tree, can be made in relation to approved works. Consideration for funds up to $3,000 may be given, at the absolute discretion of the Council. Factors to consider will include cost of the works and the amenity or ecological value of the tree.

    All applications must be reviewed prior to works being conducted.

    Recently, a resident in Skye was assisted by the RASTA fund to help retain a significant tree being strangled by ivy. The resident was informed by an arborist that if the ivy was not removed, the tree would die. Through the RASTA fund the resident was able to retain the tree and ensure longevity for years to come. The tree is now flourishing and ivy-free.

    With the new financial year beginning on 1 July, the RASTA fund will be replenished. Funds are limited.

    To fill out an application visit bit.ly/CoB-RASTA-fund.

  • Windback Wednesday - Skiing in Burnside

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    Skiing in Burnside?!

    In 1978, there was an investigation into the possibility of establishing a grass ski run at Chambers Gully. The City of Burnside’s Recreation Team considered the idea after receiving advice that the natural grassed hill on Council land was an ideal location. A private developer showed interest in the project, which included plans for a mechanical chair lift, parking lot, toilets and a kiosk. However, the project did not proceed.

    Photograph: Debra Herde demonstrates grass skiing at Chambers Gully as part of a newspaper article from the Sunday Mail, 21 May 1978.


  • Burnside Celebrates Completion of Reflect RAP

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    In a significant milestone for fostering inclusivity and understanding, the City of Burnside proudly announces the successful completion of its inaugural Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP), known as the Reflect RAP.

    Initiated in November 2022, the Reflect RAP is a testament to the city’s commitment to supporting the national reconciliation movement, guided by Reconciliation Australia.

    Crafted as a comprehensive framework, the Reflect RAP outlines specific deliverables to foster respectful relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Integral to its mission is the raising of awareness regarding the rich heritage and culture of the Kaurna People, the Traditional Custodians of the land of the City of Burnside.

    The Reflect RAP can be accessed on the City of Burnside’s website.

    The culmination of this endeavour was marked on 5 March 2024, as the RAP Working Group confirmed the achievement of the Reflect RAP. The City of Burnside is proud to have achieved its Reflect RAP goals and has forged strong partnerships in the process.

    Among the accomplishments are:

    • Commemoration of National Reconciliation Week and NAIDOC Week through hosting well-attended community events and activities, including cultural awareness training, weaving workshops, cultural walks, Author Talks and an Aboriginal language workshop.

    • Inclusion of an Acknowledgement of Country to the City of Burnside website.

    • Adoption of an Anti-Racism Statement on 25 July 2023.

    Additionally, the City of Burnside proudly unveiled Nguyanguya Muri (meaning Reconciliation in Kaurna language) an artwork designed by prominent Aboriginal artists Allan Sumner and Sarah Bates at the City of Burnside Civic Centre and the creation of Yaitya Kumartapi (meaning Indigenous Keeping Place), a collection of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander books and audio-visual material in Burnside Library for the community to borrow.

    Reflecting on the journey, the City of Burnside acknowledges the significance of the challenging and emotive discussions that transpired during the planning and implementation phases. However these conversations have served as catalysts for meaningful progress toward genuine reconciliation. Cultural awareness training was provided to equip Council Members and staff with an empathetic understanding of Aboriginal culture, heritage and values in relation to contemporary society.

    City of Burnside CEO Chris Cowley said completion of the Reflect RAP had been an important step.

    ‘It has been a privilege to work closely with our Kaurna representatives, Mayor, Council Members and staff to deliver the projects contained in our Reflect RAP as we progress on our reconciliation journey.’


    Left to right: Mayor Anne Monceaux, Cr Kerry Hallett, Lynette Crocker and Jeffrey Newchurch.

    Indigenous smoking ceremony held during a cultural walk in Michael Perry Reserve.

  • New Species Identified in Burnside

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    An inhabitant of Burnside’s reserves and wetlands, a native frog has recently been classified as a new species.

    Thanks to scientists with the Australian Museum and community amphibian enthusiasts associated with the FrogID Project, the Brown Tree Frog (Litoria ewingii) native to south-eastern Australia, has been found to consist of three geographically isolated species, not a single species as originally thought.

    Found along the southern parts of NSW, Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia, the Brown Tree Frog can be found thriving in urban gardens and parklands.

    Following the study which included audio analysis and DNA testing, the Australian Museum found the three species evolved from a common ancestor over two million years ago.

    Two recordings from the FrogID project, recorded in the City of Burnside, were used in the acoustic analysis for the project – one from an unknown property near Bell Yett Reserve and another from near Willowbridge Reserve.

    The two newly classified species are the South Australian Tree Frog (Litoria calliscelis) which is found in the Mount Lofty Ranges, Fleurieu Peninsula and Adelaide coastal plain (including Burnside) and the Kangaroo Island Tree Frog (Litoria sibilus), which as the name suggests, is found solely on Kangaroo Island.

    Kensington Gardens and Magill Councillor Kerry Hallett is a member of the FrogID Project and said frog population growth in the area was a positive sign.

    ‘It is a sign the water is clean and the environment is flourishing.’

    Cr Kerry Hallett at Kensington Wama. Inset: South Australian Tree Frog (Litoria calliscelis).

    Inset image credit: Tom Hunt via iNaturalist.

  • Dog and Cat Registration

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    Dog registration is due on 1 July and must be paid by 31 August 2024.

    It is the owner’s responsibility to ensure that their dog is registered, and failure to do so will result in a late fee of $15 and a possible unregistered dog expiation of $170.

    DACO is the database of dogs and cats that reside in South Australia. It is also the South Australian dog and cat breeder registration system.

    All dogs and cats must be microchipped and all dogs and cats born after 1 July 2018 must be desexed – unless owned by a registered breeder. Cat owners may register their cats with Dogs and Cats Online (DACO). There is no fee for cats within the City of Burnside.

    The microchip will help Council to reunite you with your furry friend if they are lost.

    DACO will send all dog and cat owners registration notifications in early July using the communications method the owner chose when first registering their dog/cat. This will be by\ letter, email, or SMS. Remember to check all the details on your renewal (addresses, telephone numbers etc) and update accordingly online. You can also change your preferred renewal option online on your DACO account. If you chose to be notified by email be sure to check your spam/junk mail. If no notification is received, please check with DACO, or contact Council as your dog and/or cat must be registered.

    To assist owners with the registration and renewals, DACO has detailed videos at www.dogandcatboard.com.au/dogs-and-cats-online/ If you are experiencing any difficulties with the renewal of your dog/cat registration, or do not receive a renewal notification, please do not hesitate to contact our Customer Experience team on 8366 4200. We are here to assist you.

    Dogs born after 1 July 2018 must be desexed and microchipped.

    Council will be contacting owners whose dogs are not desexed and microchipped to remind them of their responsibility to do so.

  • Electronic Waste Recycling

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    Electronic waste, also known as e-waste, is any electrical item with a cord, battery or switch that is broken, unrepairable or no longer useful.

    E-waste includes items such as televisions, computers, phones, kitchen appliances, hair dryers, vacuums, stereo equipment and more.

    E-waste cannot be placed in any kerbside bin.

    This is for several reasons, including fire risks, particularly for items with lithium-ion batteries. It cannot be recycled through the Council bin collection and is classified as contamination. Contamination increases the costs of managing waste. Lastly, it is banned from landfill as it contains hazardous materials, including heavy metals such as lithium and lead.

    You can recycle e-waste through drop off locations.

    There are now numerous sites where e-waste can be dropped off around Adelaide, usually free of charge. It is recommended to call the site before delivering your e-waste, to check on charges, opening hours, and what you can drop off. Below is a list of some e-waste sites:

    • Electronic Recycling Australia Unplug N’ Drop

    o Rotary Club, St Peters. Opening hours: Saturday 8.30 am - 12.30 pm. Accept small to medium items.

    o Some Bunnings such as Edwardstown and Windsor Gardens. Accept small to medium e-waste, excluding batteries.

    o For more locations, visit: www.electronicrecyclingaustralia.com.au

    • TechCollect

    o Officeworks at Keswick and Trinity Gardens. Accept all televisions, PCs, laptops, tablets, printers and computer accessories.

    o For more locations, visit: www.techcollect.com.au

    Campbelltown Waste Depot, 6 Newton Road, Campbelltown. Opening hours:

    Monday - Friday 8 am – 3 pm. Accept televisions, computers, and printers, along with some hazardous waste.

    City of Burnside Depot, 528 Glynburn Road, Burnside. Storage cage is placed in car park immediately outside of the gate. Opening hours: the fourth Monday of each month (except public holidays), between 8 am and 11.30 am.

    Batteries can be recycled for free at over 200 selected retailers, such as Foodland, Drakes, ALDI, Coles and Woolworths. Visit www.bcycle.com.au/drop-off and search your suburb for your nearest drop off location.

    It is important to recycle e-waste to ensure waste management costs are reduced and the value of resources are maximised. The recycling process also creates jobs in South Australia and reduces landfill.

    To find out more about e-waste visit www.burnside.sa.gov.au/e-waste.

  • Federal funding for Wheelchair Squash Program

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    Council is excited to announce a new wheelchair squash program will be coming to the City of Burnside later this year, with almost $40,000 of federal funding supporting this inclusive initiative.

    As part of the Australian Sports Commission's Play Well Participation Grant Program, the City of Burnside is one of 29 councils to receive funding, and the only metro council in South Australia to share in over $10 million of funding nationwide.

    This exciting new program will be held in the Kensington Community Leisure Centre, 342 The Parade, Kensington Park, in partnership with Squash Australia, Squash SA and YMCA SA.

    If you are interested in getting involved, contact our Community Connections team at communitydevelopment@burnside.sa.gov.au. We look forward to bringing this program to life in the coming months.


  • New 40 km/h Making the Community Safer

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    Following consultation with the community in 2023, the City of Burnside has completed the process of converting six precincts to 40 km/h zones.

    Six new zones as voted through the consultation are as of April 40 km/h, with the goal of increasing community safety and reducing damage and injury incidents.

    The new 40 km/h zones are:

    • Rose Park, Dulwich and Toorak Gardens

    • Beulah Park and Kensington Park (part – north of The Parade)

    • Frewville, Glenunga and Glen Osmond (part)

    • Kensington Park (part – south of The Parade)

    • Kensington Gardens (part) and Magill (part – west of Penfold Road)

    • Magill (part – east of Penfold Road).

    City of Burnside CEO Chris Cowley said the six new zones would help to deal with many of the issues community members discussed during the consultation period, including speeding, cut through traffic and safety.

    ‘This is going to be a massive positive impact on our community,’ Mr Cowley said.

    ‘This came to Council because Council listened to the community. We were receiving an immense amount of feedback where people were sharing their stories where they, or their children, had near misses with vehicles exceeding the previous 50 km/h limit.’

    Originally proposed across seven areas in the city, following community engagement, feedback came back against speed limit changes in Eastwood, while the other six were in favour by the majority. Full consultation results are available for public viewing on the engage.burnside website.

    ‘This process has been in the works for quite some time now and I want to thank our community for their patience while we sorted out the logistics,’ Mr Cowley said.

    ‘When we read the comments, it was reassuring to Council that we were heading down the right path through this speed reduction.’

    Fully in effect from late April, the new 40 km/h zones are a part of the city’s strategic plan for a more cohesive and connected community.

    City of Burnside Mayor Anne Monceaux said the involvement and passion of the community was what was able to make this project come to pass.

    ‘This change had to come from the community,’ Mayor Monceaux said. ‘If the community didn’t support it, we can’t force onto people something if they have not had a say. Community feedback was essential.’

    ‘I really want to thank everyone who participated in the engagement. The community has spoken.’


    FAQ:

    Why did the City of Burnside suggest changing speed limits in these areas?

    Following concerns raised by residents Council thought it was appropriate to bring the issue to the community to gauge interest in the changes.

    How was the community involved in the decision to create the new 40 km/h zones?

    Between 6 March – 31 March 2023, the City of Burnside invited all residents to participate in a community engagement regarding the then proposed speed limit changes across numerous Burnside precincts. A postcard with details was mailed to all residents living in the precincts with the wider consultation promoted across Focus magazine, social media and other platforms. The data from these consultations was then brought to Council which voted to support changes where the community was of a majority in favour.

    What are the benefits of the changes?

    Lower speed limits will result in fewer road incidents, creating safer precincts for residents, pedestrians, cyclists and motorists. These changes will also reduce the amount of traffic ‘rat running’ through side streets.

    When do the new speeds take effect?

    40 km/h zones are in effect as of April 2024.

    How will the new speed limits be enforced?

    As with all speeding infractions across the state, South Australian Police (SAPOL) will be tasked with enforcing the new speed limits and delegating any fines resulting from infractions. If

    residents have any concerns regarding the adherence to the new limits, please contact SAPOL.

    Where does the raised revenue from speeding infringements go?

    As mentioned above, all fines will be delegated by SAPOL, therefore all revenue raised is collected by the State Government for use in various funding programs. The City of Burnside will not earn any revenue from SAPOL enforcement activities.

    What about Eastwood?

    Even though the residents of Eastwood did not support the introduction of 40 km/h on their local streets, Council is undertaking a Local Area Study to understand transport safety,

    accessibility and liveability issues, concerns and opportunities in the suburb. Based on the result of the study, Council will develop a suburb specific Precinct Plan that highlights the actions Council intends to take to improve local transport safety, accessibility, and liveability.



    CEO Chris Cowley and Mayor Anne Monceaux



  • National Volunteer Week 2024

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    This week we celebrated National Volunteer Week 2024 with the theme Something for Everyone. Recognising the diverse passions and talents that all volunteers bring to their space.

    Nowhere is this truer than in the City of Burnside, where we have a staggering 390 volunteers across 34 different programs. Collectively these volunteers donate approximately 27,000 hours to volunteering throughout our Council area, which is the equivalent of 13.5 full-time staff.

    Volunteer with The Shed Biodiversity Nursery for three years Denise said volunteering at the nursery was a cathartic experience for her, akin to yoga and allowed her to keep active.

    ‘The people here are from such diverse backgrounds, a lot of them are still working and volunteer on their off days.’

    At a ceremony at the Regal Theatre on 21 May 2024, Burnside recognised the contributions of its many volunteers with an award ceremony and a free movie.

    Recognised volunteers in attendance included Patricia, who was awarded for her 30 years of service! As well as Sandra, Anthony and Christine were recognised for their 25 years with the city. Simone was awarded the Outstanding Achievement by a Volunteer Award, for her incredible work and dedication to the Burnside Library Toy Library.

    Ramya who also volunteers at the toy library was awarded the Premier's Certificate 'Recognition for Outstanding Volunteer Service'.

    In a study from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, in 2020 over an estimated 5 million Australians volunteered through an organisation, with women aged 40-54 the most populous group.

    Congratulations to all our outstanding volunteers for their hard work, dedication and commitment to making Burnside the best it can be!

    If you would like to volunteer with the City of Burnside, visit our ‘Volunteer Vacancies’ or email volunteer@burnside.sa.gov.au.


    Simone accepting her Outstanding Achievement by a Volunteer award Patricia accepting her Certificate of Appreciation for 30 years
















    Volunteers accept their Certificate of Appreciation for 5 years

    Volunteers accept their Certificate of Appreciation for 10 years



Page last updated: 14 Jun 2024, 03:02 PM