FOCUS On Burnside - the news hub

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WELCOME.

This is our media hub of all things Burnside.

A hub for local news about people, businesses and happenings in our community.

You will see some beautiful photos of Wyfield Reserve, one of Burnside's biodiversity sites, at the top right of this page.



WELCOME.

This is our media hub of all things Burnside.

A hub for local news about people, businesses and happenings in our community.

You will see some beautiful photos of Wyfield Reserve, one of Burnside's biodiversity sites, at the top right of this page.


  • Community Summit

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    The City of Burnside recently hosted the inaugural Community Summit in the Burnside Ballroom. Designed to bring together leading community organisations, local health service providers, charities and a range of groups and individuals including local residents and volunteers, to discuss a range of key issues relating to health and wellbeing of our community.

    The event included insightful presentations from Deputy Premier and Member for Bragg Vickie Chapman along with St Vincent De Paul Society CEO Louise Miller-Frost. Mayor Anne Monceaux also greeted our guests with a virtual welcome message which was well received by attendees who came from organisations including Anglicare, Red Cross, Hutt Street Centre and Eastern Health Alliance.

    The summit included a hands on workshop which was facilitated by several council staff with key focus areas relating to understanding the impact of COVID-19 on community services, issues relating to family and domestic violence, challenges faced by people living with a disability and a better understanding of mental health in our community.

    There were several amazing outcomes from the summit, ultimately this initiative was about helping each other identify gaps and breakdowns in the community and search for new ideas and explore partnerships to better serve those people and groups in our community who are In need.

    The City of Burnside is striving to lead by example and with new internal initiatives such as the Domestic Violence Protocol, aimed at standing up to stamp out Domestic Violence, it is events and initiatives like the Community Summit which will help us deliver positive outcomes for our community.

  • Thorpe General Store

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    Thomas and Kezia Thorpe with their six children lived on Greenhill Road from 1875 to 1907. Their nine-acre property was located opposite Sitters Memorial Drive. The Thorpe family managed a general store with products such as fruit, milk and grains sourced from their garden. The store was popular for market gardeners travelling between the city markets and the hills. The shop burned down in 1961.

    Thorpe Road in Burnside is named after the family.

    If you are interested in discovering the story behind your street’s name, check out the ‘Street Name Directory’ compiled by the @Burnside Historical Society below.

    Street Name Directory

  • Young Artist

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    The City of Burnside has supported grass roots young artists by funding youth scholarships at the Adelaide Central School of Art (ASCA).

    Two students were granted scholarships for this term’s short courses and two more later in the year.

    Nathan Cassidy has just completed a 7-week course at ACSA titled ‘Portraits and Identity’ drawing with charcoal. “I always wanted to go to art classes but I was terrified,” he says. “The teacher, Daniel Connell, was really calm and helped me a lot. We mainly did portraits, working with models, learning how to block in the shapes and then working up to a portrait.” Nathan enjoyed the atmosphere at the Glenside campus and admired the art hanging on the walls. “They were a nice group of people in my class, we just sat around the easels and worked.”

    Nathan, 19, is staying at Youth110, a service operated by St John’s Youth Services in the city. It provides self-contained apartments for short stays and crisis response to vulnerable young people in South Australia. He says the scholarship meant a lot to him. “I got an opportunity that I could not have done by myself,” he says.

    ASCA CEO Penny Griggs says many young people struggle to have the financial ability to undertake courses such as this. “Our school likes to show young people pathways in the arts,” she says. “Our collaboration with the City of Burnside has a lovely synergy.” Penny says when she reached out to Youth 110 to find suitable applicants they were thrilled and immediately identified Nathan.

    In the longer term Nathan is looking for permanent accommodation and plans to do some more courses, some in art and one in cooking.

    According to the recently released national Student Experience Survey ACSA were recognised as the No.1 Art School in Australia for Overall Quality of Educational Experience for undergraduates studying creative arts.

  • Pubs of Burnside - World's End

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    At the far east corner of the City of Burnside, part of the former village of Mak-gill (now Magill), were two hotels, World's End and the Tower Hotel. The Tower Hotel still stands at the major intersection of Magill and St Bernards Road (located in the Campbelltown Council boundary). World's End Hotel was located on the corner of Pepper Street and Magill Road.

    The World's End Hotel was built in 1845 further down from the major intersection and '...was a famous staging post for heavy traffic halting overnight at Magill with stables that were the most extensive of any in the colony at the time' (Roxley 1976). The Hotel may well have been named by the Scottish, for it had the same name as a pub on the Royal Mile (High Street) in Edinburgh. Perhaps tongue in cheek, seeing that Magill was really at the 'edge of this capital's world', surrounded by bush wattle and mighty eucalyptus interspersed with welcome hotels. The life of the World's End Hotel diminished when the tee-totallers worked to revoke its licence and it became a coffee house around 1909. It was demolished on account of salt damp in the 1960s.

    The lane entrance to the Hotel's stables became Pepper Street, and until electricity arrived around 1908, lighting was primitive, with Hurricane Lamps swinging outside the hotels. The image of the World's End in 1884, shows the hitching post and wooden water trough outside the double storied bluestone building. Although, it is documented that a Post Office replaced the hotel, the present old double-storied building next door to the Post Office looks very much like the hotel, so controversy reigns. No 550 Magill Road next door to World’s End Hotel was A C Martin's undertaker and carpentry business built in 1903 and operated by Martin's son, aged 90, till 1976. The architecture is very similar to the World’s End Hotel.


    Written by Diana Chessell, Historian to the Pubs Series


    World's End Hotel, circa 1884. B 9717. Courtesy of State Library of South Australia.


  • Rose's Gift

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    'The Shed' has come to the aid of a Hallett Cove family by handmaking a wooden chair for a young girl with bilateral cerebral palsy. Rose Stewart uses the ‘horse’ for exercises and to improve her mobility.

    Designed by a conductive education therapist, the chair requires the user to straddle it (like a horse) and use the front handle to grip and change balance. The therapist let Rose, 3, use the chair but recommended she get one of her own to use at home.

    Rose’s mother, Vicki, rang a couple of Council run Men’s Sheds to see if they could assist. Reaching as far afield (from her home) as Burnside, she was thrilled when Shed Coordinator Evan Reay said he and his volunteers could help.

    “It was a long way to travel but it was well worth it,” Vicki says. “I borrowed the chair and asked The Shed if they could replicate it for Rose.”

    Evan says it was a bit of a challenge but the men took it on. “We took measurements and photos and then I put Rob in charge of cutting the wood.” The ‘horse’ generated a lot of conversation as the guys tried to work out what it was. Within two weeks the finished work was given to Vicki.

    “The response from Evan and the men was nothing but helpful,” says Vicki. “Evan kindly had his enthusiastic team not only replicate the wooden seat but also make it more aesthetically pleasing. They also improved the front handle, allowing Rose a better grip.”

    The seat height is adjustable so it can accommodate Rose’s growth as she gets older.

    “My family is beyond grateful for The Shed's generosity, time and ingenuity,” Vicki says. “This seat allows Rose to practice her balance, seating, transfer skills and more at home every day, in between her therapy appointments.”

    Evan says projects like this make the men feel like they are really making a difference in the community. “It was probably about 10 hours work with the cutting, sanding and varnishing,” he says.

    Vicki appreciated it so much that the men are working on making two more chairs for children with similar needs as little Rose.

    George Dellar works on a 'horse' at The Shed.

  • Skateboard Art

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    The Youth Art Intensive Workshop was held over the weekend at the Glenunga Hub. Eight students created great designs and painted them onto skateboards. The workshop was led by local artist Wendy Dixon-Whiley. This is the third year these workshops have been held. It is important for Council to provide activities for youth to create engagement outside of school activities. Wendy’s bold and simplistic style makes it easy to teach and it was her idea to use skateboards. Council’s 12 month trial of a portable pump track has shown the popularity of skate boards.

    The boards will be displayed in the Cloister space for a month, starting on Tuesday 6 April.

    L – R: Hannah, 13, Glenunga International High School; Caitlin, 13, Pembroke; Alex, 13, Mary Mackillop College; Ella, 14, Saint Peters Girls; Phoebe, 13, Pembroke School; Indiara, 14, Mount Barker Waldorf; Manoli, 15, Mount Barker Waldorf; Sapphire, 13, St Peter's Girls.

  • Magill Village Receives $5.75 m Funding

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    The City of Burnside (in a joint application with Campbelltown City Council) has received $5.75 million for the Magill Village Road Redevelopment.

    The grant is part of the State Government's $290 million jobs stimulus program targeting community infrastructure across the state.

    The projects – part of a $4bn stimulus program aimed at kick starting the economy after the pandemic-induced recession – are designed to be completed within two years.

  • Linden Estate - Windback Wednesday

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    These two Moreton Bay Fig trees on Greenhill Road in Hazelwood Park were planted circa 1867 when ‘Linden’ the estate of Alexander Hay was established. The trees marked the entrance to the property.

    Alexander Hay (1820-1898) was a merchant, pastoralist and politician. He purchased land in Section 297 (now Linden Park) and built a mansion named Linden in 1867. This property was located on today’s Moore Avenue and was demolished in 1967. The Moreton Bay Fig trees and gatehouse (Linden Lodge) on Greenhill Road are reminders of the luxurious estate.

    Pictured are the two Moreton Bay Fig trees today and the Linden estate circa 1900.

  • Burnside Indian Mela

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    Tusmore Park was alive with the sounds, sights and smells of Bollywood as more than 1,500 people passed through on Sunday 21 March for the annual Indian Mela.

    A 'Mela' is a Sanskrit word meaning 'gathering' or 'fair' and is a showcase of culture, art or skill.

    With four food vendors, 11 market stalls, three children’s activities, and four performances, there was something for everyone.

    Active Education hosted 1.5 hours of children games and estimated a minimum of 200 children participating over that time.

    Children were excited about the free henna tattooing and some adults commented that the children’s activities were better than jumping castles or fair rides.

    The most popular performance was Bollywood dancing by Euphorigo Dance and Fitness Studio, with an estimated audience of 500.

    Event sponsor ‘Drunkn Monkey’ (Indian food vendor) was very happy and looking forward to the next Indian event to partner with City of Burnside.

    One child stated that the event was better than his birthday!

  • Busy in Retirement

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    Leading a busy life after your career can be quite the challenge, but finding things to fill your life with and enrich your days does not have have to be a chore. Dianne and Bruce Whittaker have enjoyed the first few years of retirement by being almost as busy as they were at work. Dianne worked in early childhood care for over 30 years, 15 in Darwin, before retiring to Adelaide.

    “Our family lives here so we moved back to be closer to them after leaving work,” Dianne said. “They were renovating their house so they stayed with us while the work on their house was completed. “Our neighbour at the time found out that Bruce could drive a bus so they suggested he volunteer with the council.

    “He’s been driving ever since, he takes the ladies in aged care homes shopping on Wednesdays and Thursdays.”

    Dianne also volunteered on the Burnside bus, helping people get on and off. “There were about 16 people on the bus and we would sit and chat with them en-route to wherever we were going,” she said. “They were all such beautiful people with great stories to tell – they all appreciated getting to be with someone a bit younger too.”

    Dianne also volunteers as a shelver at Burnside Library and attends the University of the Third Age (U3A) – a volunteer-run school for retirees. “You meet all sorts of people at the library – it’s a great place to learn new things,” she said. “I am always trying to learn something new and in 2015 a friend of mine told me about U3A – I go once a week and learn about Australian history and then run a Craft, Coffee and Chat course in the afternoon.”

    Dianne emphasised that keeping busy and gradually moving from one’s working life to retirement was the key to making a successful transition. “A friend of mine who is a teacher was thinking about retirement and said she might cut back from five days a week to three – I thought it was a great idea,” Dianne said.

    “It’s not a good idea to go from working full time to absolutely nothing – you don’t want to end up as one of those people who stares at the wall until they drop off. Bruce and I keep very busy. It feels like we both still work full time buts it’s all enjoyable work.

    “We keep really active and eat healthy too – it’s not a good idea to just sit in front of the TV and eat scones and cream all day at any age. We have family that live in Canada as well so we take every chance we can to visit them. You never know what opportunities await you when you finish working.”


    Courtesy of Adelaide East Herald

Page last updated: 21 September 2021, 16:35