FOCUS On Burnside - the news hub

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
please update image and this caption / description


WELCOME.

This is our media hub of all things Burnside.

A hub for local news about people, businesses and happenings in our community.

You will see some beautiful photos of Wyfield Reserve, one of Burnside's biodiversity sites, at the top right of this page.



WELCOME.

This is our media hub of all things Burnside.

A hub for local news about people, businesses and happenings in our community.

You will see some beautiful photos of Wyfield Reserve, one of Burnside's biodiversity sites, at the top right of this page.


  • The Old Gum Tree

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    “The Old Gum Tree” on Glynburn Road, Kensington Gardens is approximately 300 years old. The state heritage-listed River Red Gum is 29 metres tall and has a 10.4-metre girth.


    Pre European settlement, trees such as the River Red Gum, South Australian Blue Gum, Peppermint Gum and Golden Wattle once wooded the slopes of Burnside generously.


    Photograph: Glynburn Road, c. 1905.

  • Tree removals Kensington Gardens Reserve Project

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    An independent arborist and fauna expert will work alongside Camco in the removal of trees and vegetation as part of this project.

    All trees removed will be reused, where possible, for habitat features, biozone edging, Kaurna sculptures and mulch.

    Along with some exotic pest species and shrubs growing in the location of the future wetland, tree removals will include seven regulated mature trees and ten non-regulated mature trees – some that have been assessed by an independent arborist as having poor health, or are dead, and requiring replacement.

    Three of the regulated mature trees are to be removed to accommodate the new wetland. The size and location of the wetland is necessary to adequately treat the polluted water entering the reserve from the Wattle Park catchment before it is discharged into the downstream Stonyfell Creek system.

    The site will be revegetated with more than 40 trees, 1,450 shrubs and 4,300 groundcovers to be planted in the area surrounding a new wetland.

    For more information on the Project, and to see the concept design, visit https://engage.burnside.sa.gov.au/kensington-gardens-reserve-project


  • Australia Day Awards and Citizenship Ceremony 2021

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    The City of Burnside celebrated Australia Day in Hazelwood Park with an awards and citizenship ceremony.

    A total of 62 residents from 22 countries became Australian citizens with the Mayor, Anne Monceaux and Governor of South Australia, The Hon. Hieu Van Le AC in attendance to celebrate our community.

    In addition to awarding citizenship to our new residents, Citizen of the Year awards were presented to the following:

    • Young Citizen of the Year - John White
    • Citizen of the Year - Jenny Cooper
    • Senior Citizen of the Year - John Moore

    We warmly welcome our new residents to the City of Burnside and congratulate our award winners.

    To see all the images from the ceremony, please visit our Facebook page.

  • Burnside Library turns 60

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    The Burnside Library is turning 60 this year!

    On 8 April 1961, the library opened with a book stock of 7,800 and one full-time staff member. In January 2000, the old library building was demolished. The current building opened in October of the same year.

    Pictured here is the former Burnside Library. Do you have any memories of the ‘old’ library?

  • Young Citizen of the Year - John White

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    Young Citizen of the Year John White

    John White, 29, has been named as City of Burnside’s Young Citizen of the Year for 2021 at this morning’s Australia Day Ceremony at Hazelwood Park. John has been a band conductor since 2014 for several community bands. He was awarded the South Australian Band Association Band Person of the Year in 2018. John often mentors youth and provides learning support for children with disabilities and general students. Since a young age he has performed in community bands and will often volunteer to fill in on instruments. John wasn’t expecting such an accolade but says it is good to draw attention to the Band.

  • Citizen of the Year - Jenny Cooper

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    Jenny Cooper has been named 2021 Citizen of the Year at an Australia Day Ceremony at Hazelwood Park this morning. Jenny, 58, was recognised for her efforts in starting up the Australian branch of Breadtags for Wheelchairs, a not-for-profit organisation which collects bread tags and recycles them to raise funds. Jenny, of Rosslyn Park, set up a national collection network and engaged a local recycler, Transmutation in Robe, to produce bread boards, bowls and platters. By September 2020 Aussie Breadtags for Wheelchairs had recycled over 2 tonnes of breadtags, (approximately 5.4 million) and in that time has funded 14 wheelchairs. It was quite humbling to receive the Award," Jenny says.

  • John Moore – Senior Citizen of the Year 2021

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    After nearly 30 years, John Moore has handed in his resignation as a dedicated volunteer at St. Saviour's cemetery, Glen Osmond. His many years of volunteering have earnt him the award of 2021 City of Burnside Citizen of the Year.

    John, 94, took on this voluntary work when he retired from teaching at Pulteney Grammar School.

    An active member of St Saviour's Glen Osmond parish, John learnt that the volunteer who tended the cemetery had retired and he took on the task. “I was my own boss, week by week,” he says.

    He attended regularly on Mondays, even on public holidays, to do little projects, always ready with his tool box. These projects included re-aligning monuments and edging, removing old tree stumps (“I dug them up by hand”), trimming hedges, making sure that gates shut properly, fences were secure, maintaining paths, spreading gravel, unearthing an old headstone and keeping other headstones upright or safe.

    “It is important to respect the dead,” he says. “Some of the gravesites are so old that they don’t have headstones so we don’t know the history.”

    But what history he did know he regularly shared while conducting history walks during History Month in May for a number of years, as well as showing classes from local schools and the Burnside Historical Society members. Each year he organised the skip for the annual cemetery working bee and kept attendance records. He also looked after the application for Council green bins and made sure they were put out each fortnight — always as full as possible!

    John made many improvements, discussed management plans, dealt with vandalism, floods and drainage problems, trees and large branches falling, always with a positive attitude. John's achievements have been recognised by the parish and members of the public, who access the cemetery for walks, quiet contemplation, learning about social history of the area and visiting family members.

    With his 95th birthday coming up in March he thought it was time to fully retire. “I still go to see Liz, who took over from me.”

    His reaction to being selected as Senior Citizen of the Year was “I am staggered. Volunteer of the Year yes but Citizen of the Year!”

    Asked his plans for his own burial he says “I have decided, when my time comes, to be cremated and my ashes to be in a memorial at the cemetery.”

    History:

    The cemetery, belonging to St. Saviour's Church, lies to the north-east of the Church, further along Pridmore Road. As with the church it is situated on land gifted by Osmond Gilles in 1854.

    On the south side of the cemetery stands the tombstone of Glen Osmond's first resident, Edwin Olliver. Nearby are the headstones of other pioneers, including those of Redman Goldsack and his wives, Elizabeth and Christiana.

    In a central position, under the shelter of a cypress tree, is the oldest headstone, recording the resting place of Moritz F. Weidenbach (interred 1858). Many of the oldest graves are without headstones, possibly due to the relatives having left the neighbourhood.

  • No apricots in St Georges

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    In 1909, brothers Malcolm and Wyn Tweedie built their home The Croft and established a 67 acre apricot orchard in Highfield (now St Georges). They planted a wide variety of apricots, most ripening at Christmas time.

    Each year a tent village emerged in the paddock for University students seeking holiday work. The fruit business was unsuccessful, and the Tweedie brothers made more from selling their land in the 1920s than they ever did from their produce.

  • Australian silver-lead ore mining birth-place

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Glen Osmond became the birth-place of Australia’s mining history when two Cornish miners discovered silver-lead ore at Mt Osmond in 1841. Three mines were quickly established in the area: Wheal Gawler (1841), Glen Osmond Mines (1842) and Wheal Watkins (1843). Robert Watkins purchased the land for Wheal Watkins in 1842. Over its 10 years of intermittent operation between 1843 and 1916, Wheal Watkins yielded approximately 15,00 tons of ore.

    Thanks to Mayor Monceaux and Meredith Ide from the Burnside Historical Society for providing us with a brief history of the mine. To discover more about the history of Burnside mines visit the Local History Corner at: http://bit.ly/MiningInBurnside Or go to: https://www.burnsidehistory.org.au/ to book a tour, or read more about history in Burnside.


  • School Holiday Program

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    The City of Burnside runs a diverse school holiday program with activities for all ages ranging from sport, art, craft, music and outdoor play. Most sessions are booked out in advance and competition for places is fierce. One of the more unusual sessions this school holidays was a talk from author Gina Dawson who has written a series of children’s books about assistance dogs. NEXT DOOR’S DOG HAS A JOB came about after Gina had some bad experiences while out and about with her assistance dog Kiera. “I have had children approach and jump on the dog and some parents don’t seem to understand how upsetting that is,” Gina says. “It is really important that children and their parents are educated about assistance dogs.”

    The success of Gina’s first book led to two more – NEXT DOOR’S DOG GOES TO SCHOOL and NEXT DOOR’S DOG IS A THERAPY DOG. There is a fourth book in progress - NEXT DOOR’S DOG IS A VETERAN’S DOG. Gina says children are generally familiar with Labradors as guide dogs but don’t always understand that assistance dogs can come in all sizes and colours. Kiera is a 5-year-old black Kelpie and helps Gina cope with her hearing loss. “We are inseparable,” says Gina. “When she is off duty at home she has the run of the house and the yard, but is most likely to be found asleep under my desk or watching me.” Gina and Kiera undertook 18 months training through mindDog, a NSW based not-for-profit organisation that helps people procure, train and accredit assistance dogs. “Kiera was one of the youngest dogs to pass the course,” Gina says. “She is very intelligent.”

    Emily Holmes of Klemzig brought her two daughters, Cadence and Lillian, to Gina’s session and said they learnt a lot. “We had watched a documentary on working dogs so this session was perfect. It is good for the girls to understand how to behave around an assistance dog.”

    Gina’s fourth book is due out before ANZAC Day.

    Pic: Author Gina Dawson and dog Kiera with Lillian, 8 and Cadence, 9

Page last updated: 15 October 2021, 09:00