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WELCOME.

This is our media hub of all things Burnside.

A hub for local news about people, businesses and happenings in our community.

You will see some beautiful photos of Wyfield Reserve, one of Burnside's biodiversity sites, at the top right of this page.



WELCOME.

This is our media hub of all things Burnside.

A hub for local news about people, businesses and happenings in our community.

You will see some beautiful photos of Wyfield Reserve, one of Burnside's biodiversity sites, at the top right of this page.


  • When is it good to think in circles while shopping?

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    A large portion of the council’s annual budget is spent on waste management, including recycling. While it is cheaper than landfill the cost of recycling has increased markedly. This cost is passed on to residents through council rates. Council is never keen to increase rates, but the increasing cost of waste management makes that difficult.

    Council's Environmental Assets Coordinator Dr Phil, says you can help reduce the pressure on rates when you go shopping by thinking ‘circular’.

    "What does that mean?" says Dr Phil. "A ‘circular economy’ describes an economy where resources are used again and again, rather than being thrown away."

    What does that have to do with shopping? "There are more and more products on supermarket shelves that have recycled content in them," says Dr Phil. "When you buy recycled materials, you are participating in the circular economy. Buying recycled goods also has environmental benefits because it reduces the need for raw materials."

    It is easier than it sounds. Below are some examples of common items that are available at local supermarkets and online.

    Personal care items:

    • Shampoo, conditioner and body wash with recycled plastic bottles
    • Cosmetics with recycled plastic containers
    • Toilet paper made from recycled paper

    Cleaning Products:

    • Dishwashing and laundry liquid with recycled plastic bottles
    • Kitchen and bathroom cleaning products with recycled plastic bottles

    Waste management:

    • Bin liners made from recycled plastic
    • Cat litter made from recycled paper

    Food Storage:

    • Aluminium foil made from recycled aluminium
    • Food containers and drink bottles made from recycled plastic (available online)

    Stationery:

    • Printing paper, notebooks and cards made with recycled paper
    • Pens made with recycled plastic

    How does buying products with recycled content take pressure off council rates?

    To explain this matter, we need to start at the bin.

    Everything you put in a bin costs money to process. For example, when you put paper in a yellow bin it costs council to pick it up, transport it to a recycling facility, and separate it from other materials. Manufacturing companies then buy the paper and turn it into new products. The price that manufacturers pay for the paper can offset the cost of the processing. If the paper is sold to a manufacturer for $10 per tonne, but it cost $15 per tonne to collect and sort the paper, the overall process would be costing council ($5 per tonne in this example).

    Lately, the value of recycled paper has been low, which means that the cost of the recycling process is not being completely offset. But the value of recycled paper does change, and if the value increases it would offset more of the processing cost. What would make this value increase? Greater demand. If there is more demand for a product, its value increases.

    How can we create greater demand for recycled paper? We can all buy products made with recycled paper. As the demand increases, the value of the recycled paper will increase, and the sales of recycled paper to manufacturers will completely offset the costs of processing. The same is true for plastic, glass, metal and other recycled materials. The more recycled content we demand, the better. Dr Phil says we create demand for recycled materials when we buy them. "That is how we can all participate in the circular economy and help take the pressure off council rates."

  • "Lots of friendships are made here ."

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    As part of the celebration of Pepper Street's 25th anniversary we profile some artists.

    When Marjorie Molyneux retired in 1995, she was looking for volunteer opportunities. As she lived close to Pepper Street Arts Centre she inquired there.

    “It had only been open for a year,” Marjorie says. “I joined as a volunteer 24 years ago. I was also a hobby potter so I started putting work in there. I have a fascination with birds and I am well-known for making birds in different shapes.”

    The Centre was very small at first, just one old school hall which was converted into the gallery and shop. The front part was the Eastern Medical Group.

    Council extended Pepper Street and the gift shop opened and there were more opportunities for artists because there was more space. “The workshop area opened and that has been extremely popular,” says Marjorie. “Not just during the day but evening classes as well.” In 2001 the coffee shop opened and was named after local artist Dorrit Black. “Her niece gave us a recipe for one of Dorrit’s apple cakes and we served that at the opening,” Marjorie says.

    Marjorie, in her 80s, says Pepper Street is a great place for volunteers. “We have very good Council staff looking after us. Lots of friendships are made here and lots of artists feel very comfortable and welcome here.”

    Now living in Leabrook, Marjorie says she always feels better when she has been creative. “I really appreciate the diversity of art that we see here at Pepper Street, it inspires me to create more.”

  • "I like the passion that the Pepper Street team have."

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    As part of the celebration of Pepper Street's 25th anniversary we profile some artists.

    When Rosalyn Sachsse, a long time exhibitor at Pepper Street, was reminded recently that it was Pepper Street’s
    25 th anniversary she remembered clearly the Centre opening.

    “Cheryl Donaldson, who started Pepper Street 25 years ago, asked me to put some pots in so I was one of the first group of potters to exhibit there,” Rosalyn says.

    Rosalyn loves art generally, looking at different paintings and exhibitions and seeing what people do.

    “People can express themselves through art,” she says. “My pottery is quite eclectic I think because I go from one thing to another and do a lot of functional pots but also fun pottery where I just experiment. I can play with clay and it’s fun.”

    Rosalyn does not teach but exhibits regularly at the Centre. She and four fellow artists have a big exhibition in May next year, postponed because of COVID-19.

    She says art relaxes her and she can go into her garage studio, forget everything and just concentrate on her pottery.

    “I like the passion that the Pepper Street team have – they are always so enthusiastic I think it’s really great.”

    It is also a great place to meet others. “I love the fact that every time you go there it is busy, there are always people around you, doing things. There was a mahjong club there one day which I had never seen before. There is always something happening. For the community I think it’s great.”

    “It’s got a terrific range of goods and it is always a great place to buy a present,” she says.

    “I really appreciate what they are doing at Pepper Street. It is fantastic for the Burnside community but also others. People from the hills come down - it is quite well known.”

    The 25 years has gone very quickly and Rosalyn says the Centre has gone from very small and simple to a really lovely complex “with much better coffee!”

  • Native Tree Giveaway

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    Pictured L - R: Gen, Hazel, Hannah and Owen Keage

    Be part of growing our Urban Forest. Council is giving away FREE advanced native trees for you to plant in your garden. City of Burnside residents, schools and community groups are eligible for one or more trees up to the value of $75 (GST inclusive per voucher) to encourage the planting of native trees on private land.

    To get your FREE native tree, visit the Customer Service Desk at the Civic Centre or email us (burnside@burnside.sa.gov.au) with your name, the address of the property and mailing address (if different from the property address). A voucher/s will be posted to you via Australia Post. Take your unique voucher to one of the participating nurseries to get your native tree.

    Hannah Keage and her family moved in to their Hazelwood Park home in March 2020. “We had an empty spot at the bottom of the garden, so we got a voucher and went to Belair Nursery,” Hannah says. She collected a Banksia (Banksia praemorsa) and planted it. “I chose it because it is pretty and not too big,” Hannah says.

    The most popular species are Corymbia ficifolia ‘grafted’ (Red flowering gum), Banksia praemorsa (Cut-leaf Banksia) and a tie between multiple species including Acacia melanoxylon (Blackwood), Backhousia citriodora (Lemon Myrtle) and Cupaniopsis anacardioides (Tuckeroo)

    The long term success of your new tree is greatly impacted by the care taken during the planting process. Here are some tips to help establish your new tree, and provide you with a positive return on your time and investment.

    • Ensure you have located all underground utilities before planting.
    • Prepare the site for planting by digging a hole wide and shallow, two to three times wider than the root ball, and no deeper than the root ball. The hole should be in the shape of a wok to give new roots room to grow.
    • Identify the tree’s root flare (the junction between the above and below ground parts of the tree, identified by swelling or widening of the trunk). If it is not visible, gently remove excess soil from the top of the root ball until it is visible.
    • Remove the tree from its container and inspect the root system for circling roots.
    • Gently pack the base of the hole to prevent the tree sinking once the area is watered.
    • Place the tree gently into the hole ensuring it is straight and the top of the root ball is level or slightly higher than the surrounding soil levels.
    • Gently back fill the hole with the existing soil, breaking up clumps and adding organic matter (well-rotted compost) if required. Backfill the hole until it is level with the top of the root ball.
    • Stake and tie the tree loosely, if required. Trees will develop a healthier root system and trunk, resulting in greater establishment if tying the tree can be avoided, however stakes can provide protection from lawn mowers and other forms of mechanical damage.
    • Apply a slow release fertilizer. Apply a 75-100 mm layer of mulch around the tree, leaving a gap of 5 to 10 cm from the base of the trunk.
    • Finally water your new tree and enjoy it for years to come!


  • "Spinning and weaving make me feel peaceful."

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    As part of the celebration of Pepper Street's 25th anniversary we profile some artists.

    When Pepper Street Arts Centre opened 25 years ago Wilma Bajka-Van Velze was one of the first artists to exhibit. “A friend had an exhibition in Burnside Library and I was asked to join her, then they started Pepper Street 25 years ago. I became a volunteer and I have been here since,” Wilma says.

    Wilma, 80, weaves wool and then uses a loom to create scarves, wraps, shawls and wall hangings.

    She demonstrates her skills at Pepper Street every Friday, travelling from her Bridgewater home. “Spinning and weaving make me feel peaceful,” she says. “It is very satisfactory to start with a bag of wool and you finish up with a scarf or a jacket.”

    Wilma does not teach as she explains. “English is my second language and as I get older I go back to my native language (Dutch) and I do not feel very secure to give lessons.”

    She says Pepper Street has grown a lot over 25 years. “The quality of the art is a lot better now. I like the quietness and the friendliness of the staff. You come in and you feel already at peace.”

    “I have to use my hands to feel good,” Wilma says. “Some days I don’t feel like weaving so I go out to the garden and use my hands there.”

    “I love the atmosphere at Pepper Street – you come in and you feel alright, I hear this from a lot of people. It is just a beautiful place to be. And it is Sally and Ingrid and Alex, especially Sally,that make it so beautiful.”

  • "Art means everything to me."

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    As part of the celebration of Pepper Street's 25th anniversary we profile some artists.

    Kensington Gardens artist Gishka Van Ree has been teaching general and botanical drawing at Pepper Street for 14 years. Before that he taught at Adelaide Central School of Art for 18 years. “I had just left there and saw a call out in the local paper for a teacher of drawing. I applied and started two weeks later,” he says. He had to change his style of teaching to suit a different type of student. “I was teaching 20 – 30 year olds who had a degree but never really learnt to draw. Here (at Pepper Street) it is an older student base, many retired people. I get a lot of satisfaction from seeing them slowly get involved. I tell my students ‘you have to find your own language of art, your own mediums’.”

    Gishka has always worked with organic matter and has two themes in his drawing – fruit and shells. “I am very connected to the environment and nature,” he says. “I tell a story of how seed and kernels flower and then the fruit falls to pieces but the seed is always there.”

    “I do a lot of landscape gardening so that is incorporated in my art. I did a series based on gumnuts which sold out. One of them won the 2006 Victor Harbor art prize.”

    As classes commence after COVID-19, students are bringing in drawings that they did during lockdown.

    Gishka says Pepper Street is a fantastic community based gallery, one of the best in Adelaide.

    “I feel very comfortable here. I have five degrees in art but art is not an easy path to be on – you are often flat broke but art means everything to me. It has always been a part of my life.”

    He also writes a lot and has had two books published.

    “I will never retire from art, I will keep doing it until the day I drop.”

  • "Art Keeps Me Young."

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    As part of the celebration of Pepper Street's 25th anniversary we profile some artists.

    As Pepper Street Arts Centre celebrates its 25th birthday, one longtime volunteer reflects on her passion. Anne Martin was born into an arty family. “Both my parents were artists,” Anne says. “I studied fashion and worked as a knitwear designer and then craft editor of Woman’s Day magazine.”

    When Anne moved to Adelaide from interstate 20 years ago, she and her husband Ben lived in a large house on Glynburn Road at Kensington Gardens. In checking out the local area Anne discovered Pepper Street Arts Centre, an arts and cultural initiative of the City of Burnside. Anne says the Centre brings local creative people together and gives them a creative space. “I love the networking with other artists, swapping ideas and sharing events or craft fairs.”

    Anne’s craft talents include knitting, sewing, beading, embroidery and crocheting. But her great love is mosaics. “I hand paint and glaze my own tiles,” she says. “That way I can get bright colours, crystal glazes and blended colours.” Anne has adorned her house and garden with stunning mosaics, many of them as large as 6 m x 2 m. There are two strong themes to her work – birds and marine life.

    The grandmother of five teaches craft at her home on Wednesday nights. “I help my students make whatever they want to - whether embroidery, knitting or crochet.” Anne’s class is so popular it is full and she is thinking of starting another one. She also gives talks at Pepper Street on creative knitting and crochet. But one art she does not teach is mosaics. “It is difficult to take all my tiles and equipment to Pepper Street and I don’t have room here for classes. The pretty bit of mosaics is the easy part, it is the preparation and the problem-solving that is hard.”

    One of the projects Anne is proud of is her coordination of the four mosaics in the underground walkway at the George Bolton Swimming Centre Burnside. Students from three local primary schools designed the mosaics. “The style they came up with actually reflected them as students and I think that image will stay with me forever,” Anne says.

    If you like Anne’s work she will do commissions but she says, “I have to like the client and I have to like the subject. It’s very important otherwise it just becomes tedious.” In addition the client has to like Anne’s style. “I love decorative, colourful, and whimsical. If you want geometric and stylised I am not your artist.”

    Anne has plans for more mosaic design and has identified places in the garden where she will display them. “I’ve always made things,” Anne says. “I am sure art keeps me young and sane. I totally lose myself and it feeds my soul. If I don’t get studio time I get a bit edgy.”

    At 64, Anne says she now paces herself. “I knit or crochet every night unless I have had a big day on mosaics then I rest my hands.”



  • E-Bikes helping to reduce our Environmental impact

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    City of Burnside is undertaking a 12 month trial of e-bikes for staff to get to and from:

    - Site meetings

    - Home visits

    - Building inspections etc.!

    The e-bikes are part of our pledge to reduce our impact on the environment by encouraging cycling over car use where possible, and make up one small part of our environmental sustainability and climate mitigation work and pathway.

    You can read more about our advocacy for Climate Action here!

  • Biggest week on record for #rideburnside Pump Track!

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    Wow! What a first week at Newland Park!

    Mayor Monceaux put a challenge to the Community. Beat the current record of 62,313. And in just the first week, you have amassed a staggering 22,000+ laps! What a fantastic effort, already over a third of the total in just one week!

    If you haven't already, be sure to head along and check out the new configuration. You can check out a snippet of the set-up here: #rideburnside Newland Park

    Where? #rideburnside is relocated at Newland Park on Hallett Road/Newland Road in Erindale.

  • A Family of Award Winning Photographers

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    The Braithwaite children of Dulwich are keen photographers so they all decided to enter the recent Mayor’s Photography Awards – and all of them won something! Mum Sarah Cook says there was a bit of competition between her five children but they all enjoyed the experience. “The children were very excited to have been awarded places in the competition and receive the wonderfully generous vouchers,” she said. Due to COVID restrictions the usual award ceremony has been postponed but that did not deter them from celebrating. “We have decided to recreate the awards ceremony at our house this year with lots of cakes, cups of tea and sausage rolls,” said Sarah.

    And the Braithwaite winners are:

    Alice, 13, first place – Aboriginal Beauty in Burnside

    “Thank you for having the competition. It was very exciting.”

    Matilda, 17, second place – High School Category

    “Thank you!”

    Daisy, 13, commendation – High School Category

    “Thanks so much for making this competition possible! I can’t wait for next year?”

    Archie, 12, first place – Junior Category

    “Thanks for a great competition! Hope to participate next year!”

    Flora, 7, second place – Primary Category

    "Thank you for doing the competition and making it possible."

    See all the winners here.

Page last updated: 15 October 2021, 09:00